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[INGLÊS] AA manda A321 errado para o Havaí


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How American Airlines flew the wrong A321 to Hawaii

September 11, 2015



American Airlines is revising internal procedures after it mistakenly flew an Airbus A321 without proper long-range overwater certification from Los Angeles to Honolulu last month, an airline spokesman told briansumers.com.


Twin-engine aircraft operating from the West Coast to Hawaii fly over the Pacific Ocean for nearly the entire flight, and as a result, they are required to carry more safety equipment than other planes, including oxygen tanks and a special fire suppression system in the cargo hold. With the special systems, these aircraft are certified to fly on one engine for as long as three hours. That is enough time to reach an alternate airport. The certification is called ETOPS.


Obtaining ETOPs certification is not difficult but it is a complicated process, and so there's no reason to certify aircraft that won't fly on long routes over water. As a result, American has two types of A321s in its standard first class and coach configuration - the A321H, which can fly to Hawaii, and the A321S, which cannot.


On August 31, American flew Flight 31 from L.A. to Honolulu with a A321S, spokesman Casey Norton said. This wasn't necessarily unsafe - both versions of the A321s are essentially the same aircraft and each has emergency life rafts required for a water evacuation - but this is a major violation of federal guidelines.


An American employee on the ground realized the mistake while the aircraft was well on its way to Hawaii, and American decided to continue to Honolulu, Norton said. The return flight was canceled and the aircraft was ferried back.


"When we noticed it, we immediately undertook an internal investigation, and we alerted the FAA," Norton said. "We are checking our internal procedures, everything that led up to the departure. We are going to figure out what we can do better. We have gone back and made some changes to software systems."


I asked a source with operations experience how often this happens. The source was surprised by the incident. This person did not even think it was possible for an airline to send the wrong A321, as most airlines have procedures to prevent such an error.



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Caracaaa!!

Hahaha, mais um tipo de problema com fusões, misturar as mais diversas variações de aeronaves!

Neste caso a fusão da US com a AA não tem nada haver com o que ocorreu, a US nem sequer usava o A321 e a AA passou a operar recentemente , pois tb não possuía este tipo de aeronave,usava os podres B757,que vem sendo substituídos pelos novos e lindíssimos A321( digo lindo pois até First eles possuem).

O problema foi ter aeronaves homologadas e outras não,acabaram trocando

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Neste caso a fusão da US com a AA não tem nada haver com o que ocorreu, a US nem sequer usava o A321 e a AA passou a operar recentemente , pois tb não possuía este tipo de aeronave,usava os podres B757,que vem sendo substituídos pelos novos e lindíssimos A321( digo lindo pois até First eles possuem).

O problema foi ter aeronaves homologadas e outras não,acabaram trocando

A US Airways usava o A321. Inclusive era a maior operadora do modelo com 114 unidades e 7 pedidos.

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American Airlines became the first airline to operate narrowbody Airbus aircraft to Hawaii from North America on 18 August 2015, replacing Boeing 757 aircraft with Airbus A321 aircraft on two daily round-trips between Los Angeles and Honolulu. 13 days later, on 31 August 2015, American accidentally dispatched a non-ETOPS A321 (N137AA (SN 6647)) on flight AA 31 LAX-HNL. (The aircraft had arrived the previous evening on AA 178 from Orlando.) The error was not caught until the flight was well on its way to Hawaii and American elected to continue the flight to Honolulu. The return flight was cancelled and the aircraft was ferried back to California.

American currently operates 165 Airbus A321-200 aircraft. Of these, 95 came from the merger with US Airways. The remaining 70 were ordered by pre-merger American Airlines and have been delivered within the past several years, equipped with Sharklets which reduce fuel burn by four percent. These aircraft are divided into three subfleets:

The lack of additional fuel tanks clearly was not an issue so the main problem was lack of compliance with maintenance, dispatch, and operational requirements as required by 14 CFR Part 121 §161 (FAR 121.161) and 14 CFR Part 121, Appendix P.

Additional Information:

 

http://www.gcmap.com/

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