Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Carlo Fratini

Boeing 737 MAX 8 da Ethiopian Airlines cai logo após a decolagem

Recommended Posts

 

Boeing’s 737 Max Software Outsourced to $9-an-Hour Engineers

  • Planemaker and suppliers used lower-paid temporary workers
  • Engineers feared the practice meant code wasn’t done right

It remains the mystery at the heart of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max crisis: how a company renowned for meticulous design made seemingly basic software mistakes leading to a pair of deadly crashes. Longtime Boeing engineers say the effort was complicated by a push to outsource work to lower-paid contractors.

 

The Max software -- plagued by issues that could keep the planes grounded months longer after U.S. regulators this week revealed a new flaw -- was developed at a time Boeing was laying off experienced engineers and pressing suppliers to cut costs.

 

Increasingly, the iconic American planemaker and its subcontractors have relied on temporary workers making as little as $9 an hour to develop and test software, often from countries lacking a deep background in aerospace -- notably India.

 

In offices across from Seattle’s Boeing Field, recent college graduates employed by the Indian software developer HCL Technologies Ltd. occupied several rows of desks, said Mark Rabin, a former Boeing software engineer who worked in a flight-test group that supported the Max.

 

The coders from HCL were typically designing to specifications set by Boeing. Still, “it was controversial because it was far less efficient than Boeing engineers just writing the code,” Rabin said. Frequently, he recalled, “it took many rounds going back and forth because the code was not done correctly.”

 

Boeing’s cultivation of Indian companies appeared to pay other dividends. In recent years, it has won several orders for Indian military and commercial aircraft, such as a $22 billion one in January 2017 to supply SpiceJet Ltd. That order included 100 737-Max 8 jets and represented Boeing’s largest order ever from an Indian airline, a coup in a country dominated by Airbus.

 

Based on resumes posted on social media, HCL engineers helped develop and test the Max’s flight-display software, while employees from another Indian company, Cyient Ltd., handled software for flight-test equipment.

 

Costly Delay

In one post, an HCL employee summarized his duties with a reference to the now-infamous model, which started flight tests in January 2016: “Provided quick workaround to resolve production issue which resulted in not delaying flight test of 737-Max (delay in each flight test will cost very big amount for Boeing).”

 

Boeing said the company did not rely on engineers from HCL and Cyient for the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, which has been linked to the Lion Air crash last October and the Ethiopian Airlines disaster in March. The Chicago-based planemaker also said it didn’t rely on either firm for another software issue disclosed after the crashes: a cockpit warning light that wasn’t working for most buyers.

 

“Boeing has many decades of experience working with supplier/partners around the world,” a company spokesman said. “Our primary focus is on always ensuring that our products and services are safe, of the highest quality and comply with all applicable regulations.”

 

In a statement, HCL said it “has a strong and long-standing business relationship with The Boeing Company, and we take pride in the work we do for all our customers. However, HCL does not comment on specific work we do for our customers. HCL is not associated with any ongoing issues with 737 Max.”

 

Recent simulator tests by the Federal Aviation Administration suggest the software issues on Boeing’s best-selling model run deeper. The company’s shares fell this week after the regulator found a further problem with a computer chip that experienced a lag in emergency response when it was overwhelmed with data.

 

Engineers who worked on the Max, which Boeing began developing eight years ago to match a rival Airbus SE plane, have complained of pressure from managers to limit changes that might introduce extra time or cost.

 

“Boeing was doing all kinds of things, everything you can imagine, to reduce cost, including moving work from Puget Sound, because we’d become very expensive here,” said Rick Ludtke, a former Boeing flight controls engineer laid off in 2017. “All that’s very understandable if you think of it from a business perspective. Slowly over time it appears that’s eroded the ability for Puget Sound designers to design.”

 

Rabin, the former software engineer, recalled one manager saying at an all-hands meeting that Boeing didn’t need senior engineers because its products were mature. “I was shocked that in a room full of a couple hundred mostly senior engineers we were being told that we weren’t needed,” said Rabin, who was laid off in 2015.

Boeing could take three more months to fix the latest software glitch on the 737 Max, its best-selling model.

 

The typical jetliner has millions of parts -- and millions of lines of code -- and Boeing has long turned over large portions of the work to suppliers who follow its detailed design blueprints.

 

Starting with the 787 Dreamliner, launched in 2004, it sought to increase profits by instead providing high-level specifications and then asking suppliers to design more parts themselves. The thinking was “they’re the experts, you see, and they will take care of all of this stuff for us,” said Frank McCormick, a former Boeing flight-controls software engineer who later worked as a consultant to regulators and manufacturers. “This was just nonsense.”

 

Sales are another reason to send the work overseas. In exchange for an $11 billion order in 2005 from Air India, Boeing promised to invest $1.7 billion in Indian companies. That was a boon for HCL and other software developers from India, such as Cyient, whose engineers were widely used in computer-services industries but not yet prominent in aerospace.

 

Rockwell Collins, which makes cockpit electronics, had been among the first aerospace companies to source significant work in India in 2000, when HCL began testing software there for the Cedar Rapids, Iowa-based company. By 2010, HCL employed more than 400 people at design, development and verification centers for Rockwell Collins in Chennai and Bangalore.

 

That same year, Boeing opened what it called a “center of excellence” with HCL in Chennai, saying the companies would partner “to create software critical for flight test.” In 2011, Boeing named Cyient, then known as Infotech, to a list of its “suppliers of the year” for design, stress analysis and software engineering on the 787 and the 747-8 at another center in Hyderabad.

 

The Boeing rival also relies in part on offshore engineers. In addition to supporting sales, the planemakers say global design teams add efficiency as they work around the clock. But outsourcing has long been a sore point for some Boeing engineers, who, in addition to fearing job losses say it has led to communications issues and mistakes.

 

Moscow Mistakes

Boeing has also expanded a design center in Moscow. At a meeting with a chief 787 engineer in 2008, one staffer complained about sending drawings back to a team in Russia 18 times before they understood that the smoke detectors needed to be connected to the electrical system, said Cynthia Cole, a former Boeing engineer who headed the engineers’ union from 2006 to 2010.

 

“Engineering started becoming a commodity,” said Vance Hilderman, who co-founded a company called TekSci that supplied aerospace contract engineers and began losing work to overseas competitors in the early 2000s.

 

U.S.-based avionics companies in particular moved aggressively, shifting more than 30% of their software engineering offshore versus 10% for European-based firms in recent years, said Hilderman, an avionics safety consultant with three decades of experience whose recent clients include most of the major Boeing suppliers.

 

With a strong dollar, a big part of the attraction was price. Engineers in India made around $5 an hour; it’s now $9 or $10, compared with $35 to $40 for those in the U.S. on an H1B visa, he said. But he’d tell clients the cheaper hourly wage equated to more like $80 because of the need for supervision, and he said his firm won back some business to fix mistakes.

 

HCL, once known as Hindustan Computers, was founded in 1976 by billionaire Shiv Nadar and now has more than $8.6 billion in annual sales. With 18,000 employees in the U.S. and 15,000 in Europe, HCL is a global company and has deep expertise in computing, said Sukamal Banerjee, a vice president. It has won business from Boeing on that basis, not on price, he said: “We came from a strong R&D background.”

 

Still, for the 787, HCL gave Boeing a remarkable price – free, according to Sam Swaro, an associate vice president who pitched HCL’s services at a San Diego conference sponsored by Avionics International magazine in June. He said the company took no up-front payments on the 787 and only started collecting payments based on sales years later, an “innovative business model” he offered to extend to others in the industry.

 

The 787 entered service three years late and billions of dollars over budget in 2011, in part because of confusion introduced by the outsourcing strategy. Under Dennis Muilenburg, a longtime Boeing engineer who became chief executive in 2015, the company has said that it planned to bring more work back in-house for its newest planes.

 

Engineer Backwater

The Max became Boeing’s top seller soon after it was offered in 2011. But for ambitious engineers, it was something of a “backwater,” said Peter Lemme, who designed the 767’s automated flight controls and is now a consultant. The Max was an update of a 50-year-old design, and the changes needed to be limited enough that Boeing could produce the new planes like cookie cutters, with few changes for either the assembly line or airlines. “As an engineer that’s not the greatest job,” he said.

 

Rockwell Collins, now a unit of United Technologies Corp., won the Max contract for cockpit displays, and it has relied in part on HCL engineers in India, Iowa and the Seattle area. A United Technologies spokeswoman didn’t respond to a request for comment.

 

Contract engineers from Cyient helped test flight test equipment. Charles LoveJoy, a former flight-test instrumentation design engineer at the company, said engineers in the U.S. would review drawings done overnight in India every morning at 7:30 a.m. “We did have our challenges with the India team,” he said. “They met the requirements, per se, but you could do it better.”

 

Multiple investigations – including a Justice Department criminal probe – are trying to unravel how and when critical decisions were made about the Max’s software. During the crashes of Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines planes that killed 346 people, investigators suspect, the MCAS system pushed the planes into uncontrollable dives because of bad data from a single sensor.

 

That design violated basic principles of redundancy for generations of Boeing engineers, and the company apparently never tested to see how the software would respond, Lemme said. “It was a stunning fail,” he said. “A lot of people should have thought of this problem – not one person – and asked about it.”

 

Boeing also has disclosed that it learned soon after Max deliveries began in 2017 that a warning light that might have alerted crews to the issue with the sensor wasn’t installed correctly in the flight-display software. A Boeing statement in May, explaining why the company didn’t inform regulators at the time, said engineers had determined it wasn’t a safety issue.

 

“Senior company leadership,” the statement added, “was not involved in the review.”

 

Fonte https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-28/boeing-s-737-max-software-outsourced-to-9-an-hour-engineers

 

 

Agora ao invés de pagar US$9/hora para os indianos, vão pagar para os brasileiros da Embraer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A cada notícia fica mais claro que o programa MAX vai ser um dos maiores Cases de fracasso da indústria, como tantas ações mal planejadas levaram e essa situação.

 

Parece que a Boeing não esperava que o A320NEO seria tão eficiente e teve que tirar o que não tinha do 737, e num prazo muito reduzido.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

A Embraer tem tudo para "salvar" a imagem dos NB da Boeing. Tudo indica que o B797 já seria projetado com tecnologia mixta EMB/BOE. E provavelmente a evolução dos E-Jet E2 / E3 seja o futuro dos B737...

 

A Embraer não vai salvar os NB da Boeing. Igual ao colega lá em cima já citou, acredito que foi para tirar um concorrente da jogada, incorporar seus assets tecnológicos e entrar num nicho abaixo dos 737 com os E2. Não tem nada a ver com 797...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Na minha visão de leigo, acho que a Boeing deixou o lado financeiro prevalecer sobre a engenharia. É um projeto com quase 55 anos, três remodelações e que já estava no limite.

 

É uma mancha em uma família que moldou a aviação nas últimas cinco décadas.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Boeing está pagando o preço da estratégia que assumiu de manter o B737 ativo, com diversos "upgrades" que estavam chegando no limite estrutural do projeto. Como o A320Neo comercializando muito bem, ficou entre a cruz e a espada. Ou se cria um novo modelo, que com novos treinamentos, peças, comunalidade etc, tornariam o B737 um produto não competitivo ou fazer um novo "patch" e levar seu projeto da década de 60 ao limite. Optaram pelo mais provável.

 

Porém, ninguém contava com a horrível gestão do projeto em relação à limitação do produto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

esse bla bla bla de que as empresas forçaram a boeing a manter o projeto do 737 para evitar custos de treinamento, manutenção... a boeing se deixou levar por isso? se sim, se ferrou. era melhor ter criado um novo projeto mais próximo do 737 e obrigar os atuais operadores a comprá-lo. as únicas opções das empresas seriam, ou comprar o irmão mais moderno do 737 ou mudar para airbus com custo de manutenção e treinamento bem maiores.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

esse bla bla bla de que as empresas forçaram a boeing a manter o projeto do 737 para evitar custos de treinamento, manutenção... a boeing se deixou levar por isso? se sim, se ferrou. era melhor ter criado um novo projeto mais próximo do 737 e obrigar os atuais operadores a comprá-lo. as únicas opções das empresas seriam, ou comprar o irmão mais moderno do 737 ou mudar para airbus com custo de manutenção e treinamento bem maiores.

 

"(...) mudar para airbus com custo de manutenção e treinamento bem maiores."

 

Isso não é verdade!

 

Quem te falou isso mentiu.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

"(...) mudar para airbus com custo de manutenção e treinamento bem maiores."

 

Isso não é verdade!

 

Quem te falou isso mentiu.

não... o que eu quis dizer é que seria um custo muito maior para uma empresa fazer birrinha com a boeing pq ela desativou o 737 e mudar a frota para airbus. não disse que o treinamento e manutenção do airbus sejam mais caros.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

não... o que eu quis dizer é que seria um custo muito maior para uma empresa fazer birrinha com a boeing pq ela desativou o 737 e mudar a frota para airbus. não disse que o treinamento e manutenção do airbus sejam mais caros.

 

Ok!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Na minha visão de leigo, acho que a Boeing deixou o lado financeiro prevalecer sobre a engenharia. É um projeto com quase 55 anos, três remodelações e que já estava no limite.

 

É uma mancha em uma família que moldou a aviação nas últimas cinco décadas.

 

Por mais que o projeto já tenha 55 anos, pode ter certeza que o 737 NG / Max são aviões totalmente diferentes dos primeiros 737-100 / 200. Em algumas dessas evoluções, possivelmente modelaram ele em computador, e fizeram diversos estudos / simulações que não se podia fazer na década de 60, e refinaram o projeto. Pode-se ter certeza que fizeram isso, senão ele não teria conseguido brigar com a família A32X durante todos esses anos.

 

O que pode dizer do projeto do 737 ser atrasado é os comandos serem na base do cabo ao invés de fly-by-wire, algo que a Boeing já implementou com muito sucesso no 777 e 787, e a altura do trem de pouso, que continua parecida com a da época dos motores turbojato.

 

Pro 797 ser um avião totalmente diferente, só se for feito em material compósito. Se for de alumínio, será o charuto do 737 atual (que é um charuto muito bom), com novos componentes (asas, trem de pouso, estabilizadores vertical / horizontal, comandos em fly-by-wire). Obviamente, desenvolver esses novos componentes do zero, é fazer um novo projeto de avião.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

não... o que eu quis dizer é que seria um custo muito maior para uma empresa fazer birrinha com a boeing pq ela desativou o 737 e mudar a frota para airbus. não disse que o treinamento e manutenção do airbus sejam mais caros.

Mas foi o que escreveste, tb achei sem nexo a explicação que fizeste, mas agora,corrigido seu erro, entendi teu ponto de vista

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Com o prejuízo que vão ter devido a esses acidentes dava pra ter feito uma asa nova com trem de pouso mais alto e motores melhores posicionados

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Provável que todo contrato de aeronave vendida, assim como os recall dos automóveis, tenham as letras miúdas isentando o fabricante caso ocorra AOG para recall. Acho que devem se limitar a arcar com os custos dos acidentes após conclusão das investigações, caso comprovem que a Boeing seja a causa única dos acidentes.

Edited by MissedApproach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Provável que todo contrato de aeronave vendida, assim como os recall dos automóveis, tenham as letras miúdas isentando o fabricante caso ocorra AOG para recall. Acho que devem se limitar a arcar com os custos dos acidentes após conclusão das investigações, caso comprovem que a Boeing seja a causa única dos acidentes.

 

Se a Boeing coloca isso nos contratos, é um tiro enorme no pé.

A Gol foi obrigada a arrendar os aviões pra cobrir o buraco do Max na frota. Ela tá com 7 aviões parados em CNF + 3 na fábrica. Pode se ter certeza que a conta desse leasing está indo direto pra Seattle.

 

Imagine a Southwest, que segundo a Wikipedia está com 34 aviões no chão. Se eu fosse dono de uma empresa e tivesse que bancar o prejuízo desses aviões parados, eu estaria embarcando pra Toulouse no próximo voo.

 

O que talvez façam é a Boeing negociar com o Lessor de não cobrar aluguel dos clientes enquanto o avião tiver parado, e depois dão uma boa compen$ação ao lessor. E obviamente ao cliente.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Promiscuidade entre fabricante e regulador; nenhuma ética; provável corrupção de agentes públicos...

 

Parece Brasil, mas foi nos EUA. E acho que estamos vendo apenas a ponta do iceberg de um escândalo que ainda deve crescer muito.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Com o prejuízo que vão ter devido a esses acidentes dava pra ter feito uma asa nova com trem de pouso mais alto e motores melhores posicionados

 

Resumiu tudo

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boeing anuncia indenização de US$ 100 mi por quedas do Max

A Boeing anunciou a criação de um fundo de indenização de US$ 100 milhões (cerca de R$ 385 milhões) a ser destinado aos familiares das vítimas dos voos 610 da Lion Air e 302 da Ethiopian Airlines, que caíram em outubro e março, respectivamente. Os dois acidentes fatais foram causados por falhas no modelo 737 Max, proibido de voar desde então.

Wikicommons/PK-REN
default.jpgBoeing 737 Max da Lion Air caiu pouco depois de decolagem na Indonésia

De acordo com a fabricante norte-americana, a verba será utilizada para apoiar, principalmente, despesas relacionadas à educação e ao desenvolvimento econômico das famílias e comunidades afetadas. As necessidades serão atendidas em uma parceria entre a empresa, governos locais e organizações sem fins lucrativos envolvidas no processo. Ainda segundo a Boeing, o investimento será realizado “ao longo de vários anos”.

 

“Nós sentimos muito pelas vidas que foram perdidas em ambos os acidentes, algo que pesará nos nossos corações e mentes por muitos anos. Os familiares e demais entes próximos às vítimas contam com as nossas profundas condolências e esperamos que esse investimento inicial possa ajudar a confortá-los”, declarou o CEO e presidente da Boeing, Dennis Muilenburg.

 

“Sabemos que cada pessoa que pisa em uma das nossas aeronaves está confiando na gente. Estamos focados em readquirir a confiança dos consumidores ao longo dos próximos meses”, completou o executivo.

 

No total, 346 pessoas morreram nos dois acidentes envolvendo o modelo 737 Max da Boeing. Ou seja, o fundo de US$ 100 milhões criado pela fabricante equivale a cerca de US$ 290 mil por fatalidade. A expectativa é que as aeronaves possam voltar a voar em meados de outubro deste ano.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Promiscuidade entre fabricante e regulador; nenhuma ética; provável corrupção de agentes públicos...

 

Parece Brasil, mas foi nos EUA. E acho que estamos vendo apenas a ponta do iceberg de um escândalo que ainda deve crescer muito.

 

 

A qualidade da fabricação da boeing nos ultimos tempos, principalmente em Charleston, é conhecidamente baixa. Acho até que existe um episódio de uma serie de documentários que trata deste assunto disponível no netflix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

A qualidade da fabricação da boeing nos ultimos tempos, principalmente em Charleston, é conhecidamente baixa. Acho até que existe um episódio de uma serie de documentários que trata deste assunto disponível no netflix.

 

Desconfio que esse documentário foi "patrocinado" pelos funcionários de Seattle.

 

Assim como essa polêmica dos prgramadres indianos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Panamá retira banimento do Boeing 737 MAX

 

O Panamá é o primeiro país a suspender a decisão de proibir os voos do 737 MAX da Boeing, após a sua medida perder a validade.

 

Porém isso não significa que a aeronave irá voltar a voar. A Autoridad Aeronáutica Civil informou na tarde de ontem (03) que a resolução nº 441 perdeu sua validade e não será renovada.

Porém a nova resolução nº118 adverte que as aéreas com o Certificado de Exploração de Serviços Aéreos (similar ao COA/CHETA no Brasil) no Panamá deverão cumprir alguns requisitos para operar a aeronavem território nacional.

Pode se operar o MAX 8 e MAX 9 desde que:

  • O país de fabricação da aeronave tenha autorizado sua operação
  • O operador tenham cumprido com os requisitos estabelecidos pelo país de fabricação para o retorno em serviço da aeronave
  • O software de simuladores de voo, certificados pela autoridade, reflitam as mudanças de software relacionadas ao sistema MCAS
  • Todos os pilotos do operador tenham cumprido os treinamentos atualizados e aprovados pela autoridade
  • Manutenções nas aeronaves paradas sejam feitas para cumprir o cronograma do fabricante, além de um voo de teste de 30 minutos sem passageiros antes do retorno em serviço de cada avião

Vale lembrar que a Copa Airlines foi a única no mundo (até o primeiro acidente do 737 MAX na Indonésia) a incluir sessões de simuladores como parte do treinamento básico de transição do 737 NG para o MAX.

 

Na prática a nova resolução pretende viabilizar o retorno da única aérea panamenha que opera o avião da Boeing: a Copa Airlines.

O objetivo é assim que a americana FAA liberar a operação do MAX em território americano, a Copa também reinicie os voos praticamente de imediato. A expectativa é que o MAX volte a voar nos EUA até no final do ano, não antes de Outubro.

Já para as aéreas estrangeiras que querem voar com destino ao Panamá com o Boeing 737 MAX, o artigo 3 da resolução define que o voo será permitido, desde que a autoridade aeronáutica do país de origem da companhia aérea também permita a operação do MAX.

Com informações do periódico panamenho TeleMetro

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Srs.

Alguns post´s apagados por entrarem em filosofia AxB

O foco é o acontecimento e desdobramentos sobre o foco do tópico.

 

Opiniões pessoais via MP ou redes sociais para não entrarmos em um círculo vicioso.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Flyadeal cancela pedidos do 737 MAX e terá frota 100% Airbus

 

https://www.aeroin.net/flyadeal-cancela-pedidos-737-max-tera-frota-100-airbus/

 

 

Piloto automático do Boeing 737 MAX pode não desligar, diz EASA

 

https://www.aeroin.net/piloto-automatico-do-boeing-737-max-pode-nao-desligar-diz-easa/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...