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Ryanair e o COMAC C919


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Ryanair again talks up C919 potential

 

By David Kaminski-Morrow

 

Ryanair has again talked up the potential of the Chinese-built Comac C919 twinjet after entering preliminary discussions with the manufacturer over the type earlier this year.

 

The budget carrier's intent regarding the aircraft remains unclear. Ryanair has been in the market for hundreds more aircraft but has not secured a deal with Boeing, its incumbent supplier, or Airbus.

 

"We believe this [C919] aircraft will be a real alternative to the existing duopoly of Boeing and Airbus," said Ryanair during its first-quarter results disclosure today.

 

"Real competition in the aircraft manufacturing industry will deliver more choice and lower costs for airlines. We also believe that it will make economic sense for Ryanair to become a two-aircraft operator if the present Boeing fleet economies can be matched or improved by another aircraft manufacturer."

 

Ryanair signed a memorandum of understand with Comanc in June covering talks over potential supply of 200-seat aircraft, with availability from 2018.

 

Its first quarter operating profit stayed largely flat at €170 million ($244 million), as did the company's pre-tax and net surplus.

 

The airline is maintaining its forecast of a full-year performance for 2011-12 "similar" to the €400 million after-tax profit achieved in 2010-11.

 

Passenger numbers for the quarter to 30 June rose by 18% over last year's ash-affected figures, reaching 21.3 million, which helped drive up revenues by 29% to €1.15 billion.

 

But the higher revenues were "largely offset" by higher operating costs as fuel sharply increased, by 49%, to €427 million.

 

Ryanair's outlook for the rest of the year is unchanged. It has "very limited visibility" on second-half bookings or yields but said it expects a strong first-half growth to be countered by a second-half dip owing to winter capacity cuts.

 

DATE: 25/07/11

SOURCE: Air Transport Intelligence news, via FlightGlobal

 

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PARIS: Ryanair in talks with Comac to acquire C919 - O'Leary

 

By Ghim-Lay Yeo

 

Irish low-cost carrier giant Ryanair is in talks with Chinese company Comac to acquire the Comac C919 narrowbody and could order hundreds of aircraft, said the airline's chief executive Michael O'Leary.

 

"We have started discussions on pricing... if we do order, there is no point for us to order just a few, it would be over 200 aircraft," O'Leary told Air Transport Intelligence at a briefing in central Paris today, after signing a memorandum of understanding with Comac.

 

The agreement will see the airline working with Comac on the design of the C919. Ryanair is keen on a stretched 200-seat version of the C919, said O'Leary, who added that the C919 baseline model is "a little bit small".

 

The C919, scheduled to enter into service in 2016, can take 168 seats in an all-economy configuration. Ryanair's fleet of Boeing 737-800s have 189 seats each. "The extra 10 seats in a larger version of the C919 will help," said O'Leary.

 

The airline could start off by operating the baseline version, but Ryanair would eventually prefer a larger aircraft. "We could start with 20 to 30 aircraft at the start during the first or second year. We could take the baseline version first, as long as a bigger version comes along," said O'Leary.

 

Ryanair has about 30 more 737 deliveries to come until early 2012, but has so far failed to agree terms with Boeing or Airbus covering a further large aircraft deal. O'Leary foresees a need for new deliveries to begin in 2017.

 

While O'Leary said he is keen to see a third competitor in the narrowbody market, he acknowledged that Comac has its work cut out for it in terms of meeting the 2016 entry into service date.

 

"It will be a challenge for Comac. Can they meet that demand within China and the international market? But it's also an opportunity. They have to show they can compete with Airbus and Boeing," he said.

 

O'Leary dismisses criticism of the C919 programme, and believes the aircraft will be able to meet US and European safety standards, saying that the Chinese aircraft manufacturing industry is no longer a "laughing stock".

 

"I think it's [the criticism] rubbish. Will passengers fly on a Chinese aircraft? Of course they will fly on a bloody Chinese aircraft."

 

DATE: 21/06/11

SOURCE: Air Transport Intelligence news, via FlightGlobal

 

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PARIS: Comac to work together with Ryanair on C919 design

 

By Ghim-Lay Yeo

 

Comac plans to sign a memorandum of understanding with low-cost carrier Ryanair to co-operate on the Chinese airframer's C919 narrowbody, in a move that Comac hopes will lead to orders.

 

They will sign the agreement on 21 June at Comac's new European office in Paris, which will be officially established on 19 June, said a Comac official.

 

Calling the deal a "market co-operation agreement", the official said: "They [Ryanair] are an airline while we are an aircraft manufacturer. We hope to understand their needs and to incorporate them into the design of the C919."

 

Comac is developing the C919, which is scheduled to enter service in 2016. The company is aiming to get the aircraft certificated by the Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency so it can be marketed overseas.

 

Asked if the agreement with Ryanair could lead to orders for the C919, the Comac official said: "Of course we hope to work in that direction." However, he could not comment on how likely this is to happen, or how many aircraft Ryanair could order.

 

"We do, however, hope to give them the product they want," he added.

 

DATE: 20/06/11

SOURCE: Air Transport Intelligence news, via FlightGlobal

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Olha, só vejo três coisas aí:

 

Primeiro: um blefe para Airbus e Boeing, poder de barganha.

Segundo: mega desconto e beneficios financeiros da fabricante chinesa.

Terceira: propaganda de graça como sempre...hehehe

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Olha, só vejo três coisas aí:

 

Primeiro: um blefe para Airbus e Boeing, poder de barganha.

Segundo: mega desconto e beneficios financeiros da fabricante chinesa.

Terceira: propaganda de graça como sempre...hehehe

 

concordo com você

 

embora na seguinte ordem

 

Primeiro: propaganda de graça como sempre

Segundo: um blefe para Airbus e Boeing, poder de barganha

.

.

.

Terceiro: mega desconto e beneficios financeiros da fabricante chinesa

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o O'Leary ainda acha que é o queridinho das fabricantes. com as majors precisando atualizar suas frotas, fazendo compra de 200, 300 aviões, a compra de 100 aviões para ele parece trivial. ele quer é ser mimado como foi na época da sua compra de 738 com a Boeing.

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Se o O'Leary tiver liberdade para sugerir o que quiser no avião e os custos de aquisição/arrendamento e operacional forem baixos, não duvido que opte pelos chineses, além disso a linha do A320neo pelo menos já está bem concorrida!

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o O'Leary ainda acha que é o queridinho das fabricantes. com as majors precisando atualizar suas frotas, fazendo compra de 200, 300 aviões, a compra de 100 aviões para ele parece trivial. ele quer é ser mimado como foi na época da sua compra de 738 com a Boeing.

 

Nem é a questão das majors - tanto a Boeing, e especialmente a Airbus, estão com as carteiras MUITO cheias, por isso não precisam mais dar "descontos absurdos" para fechar grandes vendas...senão vejamos:

 

- Backlog do 737: 2.109 aeronaves (sem contar os 100 pedidos pela AA - ou seja, já teríamos aprox. 2.200 aviões)

 

- Backlog do A320: 2.834 aeronaves (sem contar os 260 pedidos pela AA - ou seja, já teríamos aprox. 3.100 aviões)

 

Estes backlogs representam cinco, seis anos de produção inteira - ou seja, clientes não faltam...

 

E olha que no caso do A320 ainda faltam vários pedidos pendentes de serem finalizados, como os 100 da Avianca, os 22 (?) da TAM, mais uma penca de aviões pra China, e por aí vai...(segundo um tópico do Airliners, contando-se o pedido da AA, a Airbus teria 900 pedidos de A320 para serem finalizados!)

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Esse senhor certamente não dá valor a história... Deixe ele com os comac`s, com sua filosofia arrogante, assim como a ValueJet esse ai vai longe...

ué? vai longe? ele ja foi longe!

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